In the Media

A selection of recent media coverage of our work:

25 November 2021

Mountain of wet wipes formed in the Thames

The Times

We released new data with the Port of London Authority and Tideway to show how wet wipes were changing the shape of the River Thames.

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19 November 2021

Metro Mayor Steve Rotheram endorses Plastic-Free Mersey project at litter pick

Planet Liverpool

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05 November 2021

Urban rewilding: The Londoners attracting wildlife to the capital through conservation projects

Evening Standard

Head of improving rivers John Bryden is interviewed on our London rewilding achievements.

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02 November 2021

Plastics in wet wipes should be banned, says Labour MP

BBC News

Deputy CEO Chris Coode interviewed by BBC News on how wet wipe mounds were changing the shape of the River Thames.

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02 November 2021

10-Minute Rule Bill on wet wipes

BBC Radio 5

The Thames riverbank is covered with wet wipes. CEO Debbie Leach was interviewed about the problem by BBC’s Rachel Burden.

View clip here

28 October 2021

Wetlands to be used to stop catastrophic flooding in Harrow and Barnet

Evening Standard

Our flood resilience Silk Stream project was featured in this title ahead of its official launch.

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01 October 2021

The Thames is being reshaped by wet wipes

Time Out

The Thames is rank. Really, really rank. It’s being literally reshaped by thousands of muddy, mooshy, wet wipes that are flushed down the toilet by lazy Londoners and enter the river from overflowing sewage systems when it rains. Charming. 

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30 September 2021

River Thames: Mounds of wet wipes reshaping waterway

BBC News

We released new data with the Port of LondThames River Watch coordinator A.J McConville discusses the wet wipe menace with the BBC.

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22 July 2021

River Mersey project launched to tackle plastic litter

BBC News

The amount of plastic waste in the River Mersey is to be studied in a widespread survey to try to tackle the problem of littering.

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